Was Ramses II Black or White?

Each time you will say that Ancient Egyptians were Black, one will show you Ramesu Maryimana’s picture with his straight hair in order to contradict you. He was such a great king that for a mindless person, his presumed white skin completely debunks the ancient Egyptians African origin. Westerners have then decreed that he was a red-headed White man. Yet, he wrote a text himself and engravings and paintings representing him refute the Westerners point of view. Also we will see that this very mummy that is shown below give us the key of the enigma.

Ramesu Maryimana’s mummy
Ramesu Maryimana’s mummy
Blacks of India, called Dravidians, with straight hairs
Blacks of India, called Dravidians, with straight hairs

As a matter of fact, Ramesu could not be a red-headed White man for the simple reason that Egyptians would systematically kill a red-headed White person if they were given to meet one. They estimated that this kind of person was unsuitable to live. If this regrettable practice condemns our ancestors, it clearly shows that a people which would kill red-head Whites could not have such a person for king.

Then the fact to show a mummy with straight hair doesn’t prove at all that Ramesu Maryimana and by extension Egyptians were not Blacks. Blacks have two types of hair. There are Blacks with kinky hair – who are the majority – and Blacks with straight hair like those from India, the Dravidians. Like said the Greek savant Herodotus, called the father of history and eyewitness of the antique Egypt, there were two types of Blacks in Egypt but those with kinky hair were without a doubt the majority.

When Herodotus spoke of the Colchians whom he thought were from Egyptians descent, he said: ‘In fact, Colchians – Black people which lived around the Black sea – are Egyptians; but Egyptians told me that to them, Colchians were the descendants of Senusret’s soldiers. I figured it out myself after two clues: the first of all the fact they have Black skin and kinky hair’. [1]

The fact that Ramesu’s hair was straight doesn’t mean he was not Black. But there’s the fact his hair was red! Knowing that the Pharaoh died at around 90 years old, like Cheikh Anta Diop we ask the following question: how many old persons have their hair with the original color? The answer is: None, especially as Egyptians used to color their hair in red probably with henna.

Famous representation of races under Ramesu Hekayunu (Ramses III). Egyptians (A) and the other Blacks of Africa (C) have their hairs colored in red. Are all Black of Africa red-headed?
Famous representation of races under Ramesu Hekayunu (Ramses III).
Egyptians (A) and the other Africans (C) have their hairs colored in red.
Are all Africans red-headed?
Young Egyptian girl with red hair
Young Egyptian girl with red hair

During the battle of Kadesh in Syria, where he made his legend, the king in difficulty called out for the primordial Ancestor (God) to help him; and said his enemies wanted to harm Kamits (Blacks) and steal their wealth. The fact that he asks the primordial Ancestor protection for Blacks is an undeniable element that clearly shows he was himself Black.

On the paintings representing the child king, he bears a braid on the side like the Himba children from Namibia.

Ramesu Maryimana on the left side of the picture & children from current Africa, particularly Himba children from Namibia, on the right side.
Ramesu Maryimana on the left side of the picture & children from current Africa, particularly Himba children from Namibia, on the right side.

On the second picture below where he precedes his father Wasire Suti Mery-n-Ptah (Sethi I), we can clearly see that like the picture above he was made small braids (rasta) that were then intermingled in one big braid on the side. Only the kinky hair is appropriate for this type of hairstyle. We are therefore very surprised that a mummy with straight hair is shown as belonging to Ramesu Maryimana. Have the Egyptian engravers made a systematic mistake??

Wasire Suti Mery-n-Ptah & Ramesu Maryimana in Abydos. Fresco discovered by Auguste Edouard Mariette.
Usiré Suti Mery-n-Ptah & Ramesu Maryimana in Abydos. Fresco discovered by Auguste Edouard Mariette.

Let’s come back to the mummy which gives the word of the end. One of the major differences between a Black person and a non-Black one is the jaw. A Black person jaw is pushed at the front side of the face and it is called prognathism. A non-Black person jaw is aligned with the forehead and this is called orthognathism. Prognathism can only be seen on Blacks.

The king is clearly touched by prognathism, he is therefore Black.
The king is clearly touched by prognathism, he is therefore Black.
Ramesu Maryimana, wearing the royal multicolor colar like the Maasais of Kenya-Tanzania and the Xhosas of South Africa. He has a snake on his royal helmet, the same way the Yoruba kings of Nigeria had
Ramesu Maryimana, wearing the royal multicolor collar like the Maasais of Kenya-Tanzania and the Xhosas of South Africa. He has a snake on his royal helmet, the same way the Yoruba kings of Nigeria had (Source of the image : Le fabuleux héritage de l’Egypte, Christiane Desroches Noblecourt, page 180, édition de poche)

Herein below the mummy presented is clearly touched by prognathism. Ramesu is therefore Black.

If we accept that the mummy presented here is Ramesu Maryimana’s, then we can conclude that it’s about a Black man with straight hair, whose hair had been colored with henna when he died.

Hotep!

By: African History-Histoire Africaine © (All rights reserved. Any copying or translation of the text of this article is strictly forbbiden without the written approval of Lisapo ya Kama)

Notes :

  • [1] Antériorité des civilizations nègres (Black civilizations’ Anteriority), Cheikh Anta Diop, page 35.
  • Hymnes et Prières Kamites (Hymns and Khemit prayers), Jean Philippe Omotunde, page d’introduction.
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