Taharqa, the last great king of the Nile

In 1090 BC, Egypt sank into anarchy. The numerous captured and enslaved white invaders managed to free themselves and devastated the indigenous Black authority in the North of the country. The legitimate power and the clergy took refuge in the South. White Libyans and Asians set up little kingdoms in the delta and established a feudal power.

Taharqa, the legendary sudanese pharaoh of Egypt Illustration by National Geographic
Pharaoh Taharqa leading the procession during the ceremony of Opet. Mandjet (the solar boat) representing the route of God in the sky was exposed for the occasion. The king is here dressed up with a feline skin like all African chiefs (Illustration by National Geographic)

For 300 years, Ta Meri (Egypt) was into chaos. In that context, the clergy of Waset (Thebes) called on the king of the ancestors’ country, the Sudanese Piankhi, for help. He entered Egypt, and widely conquered the delta. His brother Shabaka who followed him continued the recapture of the delta, under the acclamations of the Egyptian people who was seeing him as a legitimate ruler.

The unceasing tensions with Asia put General Taharqa – son of Piankhi – in the front line of history, a man whose reign marked the rebirth and the decline of the Pharaohs’ country.

Fighting Assyrians over Asia, Egypt responded to the cry for help of the Jews who were threatened by the enemy. Taharqa with 200,000 men entered Asia and saved the Jews in Jerusalem but he was later on defeated by the Assyrians and withdrew in Egypt, after his army had been betrayed by the foreign peoples of the delta.

Taharqa making offerings to Horo (Horus), his totemic equivalent as a pharaoh (Musée du Louvre)
Taharqa making offerings to Horo (Horus), his totemic equivalent as a pharaoh (Musée du Louvre)

After he murdered Pharaoh Shabataka, Taharqa Saré Maryamani (Taharqa, son and loved by God) was crowned as king of Egypt and Sudan in 3547 of the African era (689 BC). One of his names was Khui-Tawy; that is to say the one who protects the 2 lands (Upper and Lower Egypt). He proclaimed himself as the son of Mut, God’s feminine part. In spite of his defeat in Asia, the partially restored military power of Egypt enabled Taharqa to finish the work of his predecessors by dominating the foreigners of the North in a significant way.

Taharqa British Museum
Taharqa

British Museum

He did not hesitate to deport to Sudan the women and the children of those who were challenging his authority. He strongly militarized the Egyptian society. He frequently responded to the Assyrian attacks and intervened in Asia to restore the lost dominance of Egypt in the region. Sudan and Egypt experienced an exceptional economic prosperity and a cultural revival for 20 years. Taharqa distinguished himself by a gigantic architectural work in the empire.

Once again betrayed by the foreigners of the North, Egypt was invaded by Assyrians. The Pharaoh took shelter in Sudan from where he undertook again an offensive of great energy, reconquering his country. 3 years later, he was repelled and took refuge in Sudan where he died. His successor the Sudanese Bakaré Tantamani, son of Shabataka, took the country over again, before seeing the Assyrians tumbling on Thebes which they devastated.

The violent destruction of the holiest, untouchable, venerable and multi-millennial capital of the Black World caused a terrible shock. From then on, Egypt was weakening, the waves of migration of Egyptians to the rest of Africa really began and the country of the Pharaohs was successively under the domination of many invaders until the Arabs took it over in 640 AC.

As for Taharqa, by his military ability to defend and restore for the last time the country which civilized humanity, he is considered as the last great king of the Nile Valley.

The gigantic constructions of Taharqa in the biggest religious building in human history: The temple of Karnak in Egypt. Karnak was dedicated to the worship of Ama/ Imana/ Amen/ Nyamien/ Nyambe/ Nzambi etc..., the unique God of Africa.
The gigantic constructions of Taharqa in the biggest religious building in human history: The temple of Karnak in Egypt. Karnak was dedicated to the worship of Ama/ Imana/ Amen/ Nyamien/ Nyambe/ Nzambi etc…, the unique God of Africa.
Temple de Dieu au pied du Gebel Barkal, Soudan. Construit par Taharqa Reconstitution de Learning Sites, Inc
Temple of God at the base of Gebel Barkal, Sudan, built by Taharqa (Source : Reconstitution of Learning Sites, Inc)
Temple de Dieu à Kawa au Soudan Source image : http://www.griffith.ox.ac.uk/gri/heathcote/image.php?i=50
Ruins of the temple of God in Kawa in Sudan, built by Taharqa (Source image : http://www.griffith.ox.ac.uk/gri/heathcote/image.php?i=50)

PS: We know today that Taharqa led his armies to Spain. The African-Guyanese historian Ivan Van Sertima (in The Golden Age of the Moor, page 2) reports the writings of Florian de Ocampo, a Spanish historian of the 16th century and author of Cronica General. The presence in Spain of a man named Tarraco is mentioned there, at the head of his Ethiopian armies (i.e. Sudanese), and who later on became king of Egypt.

PS 2: We know today that the Sudanese helped at first the Libyans to maintain their power over Egypt and that the Libyan dynasty was predominantly black. This probably explains why it did not cause the hostility of the Sudanese. Although there were undoubtedly white foreigners who played later a role in the invasion of Egypt by the Assyrians, the events of the 22nd dynasty until Shabaka came to power were therefore internal African fights.

By : Lisapo ya Kama ©

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